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Fiat VIVO

December 2013

A subscription based car-sharing service with autonomous vehicles

In 2013 more than 90% of all cars are parked, not used. VIVO is a car sharing program designed for 2020, where these parked VIVO cars will be used as a car-sharing service. When you own a VIVO, you can share it with other VIVO-members when you’re not using it yourself. Fiat is a worldwide brand, which means that – once you become VIVO member – you can borrow other VIVO vehicles all over the world. This means you’re not just buying a car, but you’re buying worldwide mobility. The VIVO vehicles are autonomous, which makes them ideal for sharing. Below you’ll find an illustration of a typical weekday of you and your VIVO. In the morning your VIVO will drop you off at work. Once you decide to share it it will drive itself to other users.

A typical day of you and your VIVO
A typical day of you and your VIVO

The VIVO system will be offered as a subscription, so it’s almost like your phone contract right now. You will pay a certain amount a month, but this includes everything (as seen in the circle below). This is good for the customer – since they don’t have all the hassle – and also good for Fiat, since this allows them to earn some money on services around the car.

Subscription based service
Subscription based service

Interior Design

During this team project I was responsible for the interior design. Because it is a shared autonomous vehicle the interior could be quite different from conventional cars right now. I took my main inspiration from street furniture. I found it inspiring to see how a single piece can offer many solutions in terms of seating angles and seating heights. People can walk up to it and use it in many ways. I tried to achieve something similar with my interior. I created various seating angles and heights, allowing for multiple seating arrangements. I also focused on storage solutions, both private (for the owner of the vehicle) and public (for any user).

Main inspiration - Street furniture offering many different angles and heights
Main inspiration - Street furniture offering many different angles and heights
Sketch development for the layout
Sketch development for the layout
Use the space however you like, for example to discuss a presentation
Use the space however you like, for example to discuss a presentation
When the table is folded down the vehicle offers a big storage space
When the table is folded down the vehicle offers a big storage space
Private locker space for the owner of the vehicle
Private locker space for the owner of the vehicle
Development of the steering wheel
Development of the steering wheel
The steering wheel contains control lights
The steering wheel contains control lights
Interaction both by gesture and touch interface (interface design by Isil Sun)
Interaction both by gesture and touch interface (interface design by Isil Sun)
All features of the interior
All features of the interior
Final design (exterior design by Daniel Quinlan)
Final design (exterior design by Daniel Quinlan)

Formula E

April 2013

Drayson Racing, a British racing team, came to us with a brief to design their future Formula E car. During 2014, the first year of Formula E, they will race a Spark-McLaren Formula E car. However, for the following years they’re looking for a completely new design. We were asked to forget what the current Formula cars look like, and come up with something new and exciting. I decided to start my project by giving a little twist to the usual way of designing a racecar. Usually we use a windtunnel to tweak the shape for aerodynamics. For my project I thought it would be interesting to let an airflow ‘create’ the shape, instead of creating it myself.

Experimental shapes created with an airflow
Experimental shapes created with an airflow

I connected some lightweight materials to a fan, and made some high-speed photos. By experimenting with materials and light I came up with some interesting outcomes. I used the photos to create top and side view renders; I accentuated the lines that I felt were most important, resulting in speedy shapes.

Renders created with the experimental outcomes
Renders created with the experimental outcomes
Key sketch
Key sketch

I found one of the outcomes to be particullary interesting. Mainly because of the fast flowing lines at the top, and the ‘hole’ in the bottom that looks like an air-intake. I used this shape as inspiration for further sketch development.

Development sketches
Development sketches
Side view with driver position
Side view with driver position
Final design on package
Final design on package

Auto Union Type D

March 2013

In association with the annual car concours Salon Privé we redesigned some classic cars. I chose to redesign the famous Auto-Union Type D racecar, built in the end-1930’s. It’s well-known for its enormous power, and terrible handling. It was said that a driver could induce wheelspin at over 100 mph (160 km/h). With the redesign I tried to keep this powerfull character.

Research & inspiration
Research & inspiration
Sketch development
Sketch development
Final design
Final design

Resonate

March 2013

The reason I named this project ‘Resonate’ is because of one of its definitions: “Be filled with a deep, full, reverberating sound”. This definition applies to this project very well, because I used sound in three major areas of my design process. As you can see in the structure below, I chose a soundtrack which influenced my shape, colour, and driving characteristics of the car.

The structure of my concept
The structure of my concept

1. The shape

First of all I used software named Alchemy to come up with inspiration for the shape of my car. The software uses microphone and sketch tablet input to generate shapes. By drawing with my tablet I decide where the shapes appear, the software decides what the shapes will look like. So for example, when the music becomes louder, the shapes might grow in size. In this way it generates crazy compositions every 15 seconds. Watch the video below to see it all in action.

How to create shapes with music
How to create shapes with music
Sketches made with the software output
Sketches made with the software output

I used the software output to create sketches of my car. I made new compositions by manupulating the output in several ways. The sideview at the bottom was my key-sketch during the next stages of my design process. I continued the project by making hand-size claymodels, to get a better 3D understanding of my shape. I used the sketches and claymodels to create a digital 3D model with the proportions of the clay, and the feeling of the sketches.

Hand-size claymodels for better 3D understanding
Hand-size claymodels for better 3D understanding
Translating the inspirational sketches and claymodels into a 3D model
Translating the inspirational sketches and claymodels into a 3D model

2. The colour

Below you can see how I used my soundtrack to find colours related to this particular song. The first example shows how I entered the artist into Google image search, and used Photoshop to calculate the average colour of these search results. In this way you can find a colour for any artist. The most right image shows the frequency spectrum of my soundtrack. I divided this into three audible areas of low / middle / high tones. The area with the lowest frequency sound is linked to low frequency light (red), and the high frequency sound is linked to high frequency light (blue). If you combine the data of these three areas you end up with a RGB value related to the song.

Finding colours with averaging Google results, or linking the frequency of light to frequency of sound
Finding colours with averaging Google results, or linking the frequency of light to frequency of sound

The idea is to have a solid opaque shape at the center of the car, covered with a layer of OLED lighting. The OLED layer will change it’s colour acording to the music played inside the car, and the coloured light shines through the transparent surfaces on the outside. This is illustrated in the image below.

Changing the colour with OLED-technology, covered with the random surfaces
Changing the colour with OLED-technology, covered with the random surfaces

The following three images show how the colour of the car changes. The OLED lighting can be adjusted to the colour determined with the methods above. You can simulate the colour-change by clicking the swatches below the images. The lighting will be quite delicate in light environments, it will give the car colour but nothing more than that. In darker environments the lighting will be a bit more intense, as there is less light in the environment.

Colour change in side-viewColour change in side-viewColour change in side-view
Colour change in side-view
Change the colour:
Colour change in light environmentColour change in light environment
Colour change in light environment
Change the colour:
Colour change in dark environmentColour change in dark environmentColour change in dark environment
Colour change in dark environment
Change the colour:

3. The driving characteristics

The third and final area is the driving characteristics of my vehicle. I found a few articles on the beats per minute (BPM) of a song, and how it influences our driving behaviour. Apparently people tend to drive faster and make more traffic violations when they are listening to a song with a high amount of BPM. I want to use this phenomenon to my benefit. My car will listen to the music played by the driver, it determines the BPM and adjust the driving characteristics to the situation.

Driving characteristics during low BPM music
Driving characteristics during low BPM music
Driving characteristics during high BPM music
Driving characteristics during high BPM music

To round up, the music influenced my design, it will influence the colour of the car on the go, and last but not least, it will influence the driving characteristics of this vehicle. Driving this single-seater car will be a very intense personal experience, driven by you and your favorite music.

Citroën LockLift

November 2012

Citroën gave us a brief which told us to individually develop a global van with flexible options, to move goods quickly and quietly, conveniently and with proper concern for roadspace, roadusers and yourself – the ultimate receiver of the goods. During the research phase of this project I discovered that failed deliveries are a big and money wasting problem. According to IMRG it costs the UK more than 850 million pounds a year. I decided to tackle this problem by delivering big packages to public places, instead of people’s homes. With my concept people won’t need to be at home to receive their packages, the packages are stored at a public area with lockers. These areas are located within walking distance of people’s homes, and both the recipients and delivery companies have 24/7 access.

Delivering packages to public ‘locker-areas‘ instead of delivering to people’s homes
Delivering packages to public ‘locker-areas‘ instead of delivering to people’s homes

Basically, all packages arrive in one of the two city hubs. Here they get scanned and distributed among 30 borough hubs, which are spread out over London. In these borough hubs the packages get scanned again, and sorted for each ‘locker area’. The packages are stored in lockers and the lockers are loaded onto my van. The image above shows a borough hub. Where the yellow lines are the conveyor belts for the packages, and the blue ones for the lockers.

System within a borough hub
System within a borough hub
Some of the sketches
Some of the sketches
Front-view while dropping of a locker
Front-view while dropping of a locker
The process of loading and unloading the vehicle
The process of loading and unloading the vehicle